2022: Missouri’s Spring Wildflowers – “Wild” Red Columbine.

Red columbine (Aquilegia canadensis) is a beautiful and unique native plant. Delicate red and yellow flowers resemble tiny ballerinas as they dance on slender red stems over finely divided blue-green leaves in late spring to early summer.

Its lovely floral display, ease of growing, and overall charm, make red columbine a great plant for the native wildflower garden.

Young Bud of a Columbine (Aquilegia canadensis) with sepals

These sepals are tinged with pink, and the bud’s distinctive spurs have grown long enough to be clearly visible.

Eventually, both the sepals, and spurs take on their final deep red colour. 

The flowers are single on long stems, with a distinctive shape, the 5 petals forming elongated, hollow, red spurs containing nectar; the 5 sepals are leaflike, attached between the petals, light yellow. The numerous stamens extend below the flower. Blooms April–July.

Wild Red Columbine

There are 20+ stamens of unequal length surrounding the pistil and several longer styles.

Pistil, Stamen and Styles

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2 Comments

  1. Definitely gonna find some spots to grow them in the garden. The cover image looks like a beautifully crafted jewel.

    1. fotografiabymíguel – Midwest – I am of Trinidadian/Venezuelan roots. For as long as I can remember, I’ve had an interest in nature & wildlife, my mother and grandparents were my biggest sources of inspiration and influence. Growing up in the Southern Caribbean, I would spend many hours catching insects, then letting them go, I would watch tropical birds fly into the trees in the yard and I tried to document them by sight. I have always been intrigued by natural history, and it is that love for nature that drew me to photography. One day, I would like my Photography to be used for Conservation, Education & Inspiration.
      fotografiabymíguel says:

      A great woodland species for any wildflower garden. Hummingbirds love them.

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